Local Reports

Breast Cancer Stats

  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States.
  • The highest concentration of breast cancer in the United States is found in the San Francisco Bay Area.
  • Nearly 400 Sonoma County women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year.
  • About 85 Sonoma County women will die of breast cancer this year.
  • Over half of the 10 million Americans over age 50 have osteoporosis, of which 80{dc1c9f7d3bd57e574f013efe1b06ca091eec642d5aade6bef43edf80ab8addba} are women.

Publications

PDF_DataStats_01 PDF_DataStats_02 PDF_DataStats_03
Chronic Disease:
Fact Sheet, Cancer
Sonoma County
2009
Economic
Development Board
Sonoma Indicators
2011
Queen of the Valley
Medical Center
Cancer Center
2010 Annual Report
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PDF_DataStats_05 Selected Cancer Facts report
 2010 Marin County
Data Summary:
Leading Causes of Death
2003-2007
 Selected
Cancer Facts
Sonoma County
2011 Factsheets
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Incidence Rates for California’s Most Common Cancers:
Sonoma County, 2004-2008

chart_01-1

Rates are shown as the number of new cases or deaths per 100,000 persons. All rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 United States Standard Population. *County rate is statistically significantly different from the Statewide rate (p<0.05).

Incidence Rates for California’s Most Common Cancers:
Sonoma County, 2004-2008

chart_02

Rates are shown as the number of new cases or deaths per 100,000 persons. All rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 United States Standard Population. *County rate is statistically significantly different from the Statewide rate (p<0.05).

Sonoma County Estimated Number of New Cancer Cases and Deaths, 2011 (Major Sites) Cases

CANCER TYPE CASES DEATHS
Breast
Prostate
Lung & Bronchus
Colon & Rectum
BladderAll Sites
425
365
260
235
1252,470
75
55
225
80
30945

California Report

California's Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan

California’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan

Dear Californians,

This is the second Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan issued by California Dialogue on Cancer (CDOC), a coalition of cancer control stakeholders from across the state. The goals of CDOC are to reduce cancer suffering and mortalit in California. This plan sets forth strategies that will help to accomplish these goals. CDOC’s first plan, published in 2004, helped guide California’s efforts to reduce the burden of cancer through 2010. During this period, cancer mortality and incidence rates steadily decreased; however, cancer continues to be a major health threat. Cancer, second only to heart disease as the cause of death of Californians, has touched all of our lives. Approximately every four minutes, a Californian will be diagnosed with cancer, and every ten minutes, a Californian will die of cancer. Thus, we must not relax our efforts to combat this terrible scourge.

This plan summarizes current data on the most common cancers we encounter in California. Cancer control stakeholders should use the objectives and strategies outlined in this plan to guide their efforts in reducing cancer incidence and mortality in the people they serve. In addition, this plan contains screening and lifestyle recommendations everyone can follow to reduce the risk of selected cancers.

Many experts throughout the state gave generously of their time and knowledge to develop this plan. Their cooperative efforts serve as a model of the kind of collaboration needed to accomplish our goals. I would like to thank the contributors listed on the following pages for their creative time, effort, and expertise.

Sincerely,
Daniel S. Anderson MD, FACP – Chairman, Excutive Committee

Read California’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan

California’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan—Contents

Letter from the Chair

Cancer Plan Revision Committee

Introduction

The Cancer Burden in California
– California’s Cancer Plan 2004: Progress Summary
– Cancer Plan 2011–2015: Goal Summary

Primary Prevention
– HPV – Obesity – Tobacco Use – Ultraviolet Exposure

Early Detection and Screening
– Breast Cancer – Cervical Cancer – Colorectal Cancer
– Melanoma – Ovarian Cancer – Prostate Cancer

Cancer-Related Health Disparities

Survivorship Research

Cancer Surveillance

Advocacy

Additional Cancer Site-Specific Objectives
– Breast Cancer – Cervical Cancer – Colorectal Cancer
– Melanoma – Ovarian Cancer – Prostate Cancer

Appendices

– Technical Definitions
– CDOC Executive Committee
– Cancer-Related Data Sources
– A Call to Action: What Can You Do?
– CDOC Membership Enrollment Form